Sponsor a Client

Michelle was born profoundly deaf and has identified herself as being culturally Deaf. She attended Gallaudet University and received her doctorate degree (Ph.D.) in Clinical Psychology.  When not working, Michelle is active and enjoys the outdoors of New England. She can often be found hiking, running and camping during her down time.

I am a 37 year old late deafened adult. In 2006 I started having trouble with my hearing in both ears and in December of that year I got my first pair of hearing aids. Over the next 9 months my hearing loss became very progressive and I started having vertigo and balance issues as well. Nothing in life could have prepared me for what I was going through or how it was going to impact my life as I knew it. I didn’t know how to live in the world when I could hardly make out what people were saying and it lead to a lot of isolation and anxiety. It has been a hard and emotional journey figuring out how to start my life over as a late deafened adult because it changed absolutely every aspect of my life. Fast forward 9 years to 2015 and I am proud to say that despite my challenges, I have come a long way.

Hi, my name is Wytske and I am 54 years old. I have recently had to stop working because of progressive hearing loss. My cochlear implant has not provided sufficient support and my other ear progressed to profound deafness. I cannot locate sound and I no longer hear sufficiently for moving through traffic. I have burned food and kettles–because I cannot hear their whistle. I am unable to hear fire alarms, and often don’t have anyone in the house that can assist me. While traveling, I have missed train and plane connections because of announcements that I could not understand. I even ended up in a wrong city when attempting to visit my sister! Hearing loss is a non-visible disability, and people don’t realize I cannot hear, or forget about it just after I tell them. I no longer participate in social activities because of my inability to understand conversation. I hope that my recent approval into the NEADS program will result in increasing my ability to function on a daily basis and re-open up the world around me.

Let me just start by saying - thank you for your time. I have had hearing issues for several years but I still like to walk, garden, swim, and lead an active life. A NEADS Service Dog for hearing would help me do that.

My name is Debbie Liebl. I became deaf from spinal Meningitis when I was four years old from a birthday party of 20. All 20 party kids contacted Meningitis. Only 5 of us survived and I was one of the survivors.

Friends, neighbors, acquaintances lend me your ears: Most parents do not look forward to becoming empty nesters, but I dread the thought of living alone. I am a single mother of two young adult children who currently still live at home, but will not always. As an additional trial, I became deaf in my left year 17 years ago, and became hard of hearing in my right ear three years ago. Thankfully, I have been accepted as a recipient of a hearing service dog from from NEADS National Education for Assistance Dog Services, also known as Dogs for Deaf and Disabled Americans. While having a service dog partner would not take the place of my absent family, they can be my ears.

My mother, Nancy, has alway been hard of hearing (doctors attributed it to a severe case of scarlet fever as a child). As teenagers, my siblings and I were often impatient with this loss and instead of repeating ourselves when she asked us to, we would say “Ma, get some hearing aids!”. Eventually, she took our advice and purchased hearing aids (something that her health insurance does not cover), and found these to be extremely helpful. In the last five years, however, her hearing has declined, to a point where even the hearing aids are not helping to ease her hearing deficit.

My hearing has decreased over the last several years to the point that I find it necessary to ask for help from the NEADS program. Hearing loss is genetic in my family but mine has also been affected by chemotherapy.

Hi my name is Jessica Sinclair and I am a third year student at Rochester Institute of Technology, studying Journalism. I am trying to raise funds for a Hearing Dog to help me to live independently. I am currently working at Walmart Store, part-time while attending school, in hopes of earning funds towards my goal of acquiring a Hearing dog.

I am Samantha and I have a progressive connective tissue disorder (Stickler Syndrome) that affects my hearing, my vision and my joints. I have moderate/severe hearing loss in both ears. I’ve worn hearing aids since I was seven months old. I am very nearsighted and have worn glasses since I was 13 months old. I have also had extensive joint pain since I was two years old. Looking at me you would never know anything is wrong because I look “normal”. My hearing dog, Debbie, has completely changed this for me! She has truly been the biggest blessing to ever come into my life. I do not need to constantly worry about if I do not hear something going on around me, as Debbie will now jump in and help me. She is also a very visual cue to others that I am hard of hearing and my communication needs are different and to always approach me from the front so I can see and hear what they are saying.

Overnight I suffered a profound, severe hearing loss at the age of eighteen. Though it was going to take more than that, I thought, to derail my college plans and dreams of majoring in French and Theatre - off I went. One semester later I found myself closer to home, and closer to Boston for medical treatments. I tried every hearing device, medication, and had every test possible - nothing aided me. No verdict was reached on how or why I lost my hearing. I did not show signs of loss or illness, but it was just left that I suffered a virus of some sort. In the beginning, doctors thought it was a one time loss, and not progressive. Recently, it was determined that I had lost significantly more and likely will continue to progress at the same rate. I likely will be deaf in my lifetime.