Articles/Featured Stories

An archive of select articles and media coverage featuring NEADS, NEADS clients, and NEADS staff.

Pew Charitable Trusts: Tightening the Leash on Fake Service Dogs

BU Daily Free Press: Proposed state bill cracks down on fake service dogs

Soon, however, this manipulation of federal law could be banned by the state government, with a bill calling for the misrepresentation of a pet dog as a service animal to be a civil offense. Full Story

CBS Boston: Bill Would Penalize People For ‘Fake’ Service Dogs

Parenting Special Needs Magazine: Considering a Service Dog? Meet My Monty

The Boston Globe: The story of Rescue and Jessica, a dog, a woman, and rebirth

At the park, Rescue the black Labrador chases balls down and leaps with athletic abandon.

He came into Kensky 's life six months after the Boston Marathon bombing. Full Story

Worcester Telegram: CEO One on One: Gerry DeRoche

Chief Executive Officer, Gerry DeRoche, has been leading NEADS since 2010, when he made the decision to leave a 33-year career in banking for the nonprofit world. The University of Connecticut graduate resides in Concord with his family, which includes two golden retrievers. Full Story

Providence Journal: Handling with care: By training service dogs, ACI inmates help others

John Hill, Providence Journal: On Tuesday morning, two dozen inmates filed into the cafeteria at the John J. Moran Medium Security Prison. There were 13 dogs in the room with them.
But the dogs weren’t there to guard the inmates; the inmates were there because they train the dogs.

The Boston Globe: Princeton nonprofit sells stuffed marathon service dogs

Sacha Pfeiffer, The Boston Globe: In need of a ‘Rescue’? Nonprofits are always on the hunt for new revenue, and some of them dabble in retail to bring in extra money.

Think museum gift shops or online stores selling coffee mugs and note cards. Now NEADS, a Princeton, Mass., nonprofit that trains service dogs, wants to bolster its fledgling retail operation — and, if history repeats itself, the item it’s selling won’t stay in stock for long.

The Boston Globe: Her decision, their life

Eric Moskowitz, The Boston Globe: They were full with newlywed love that brilliant Marathon Monday, fused in joy and then in disaster. Raked by the blast, Patrick and Jess would both lose their left legs. But Jess, harder hit, has held for two years now against the loss of her right. Everything seemed bound up in that choice.

WCVB-TV: Service dogs Jake, Rossi Boy named after fallen firefighters

Two service dogs-in-training have been named after two Boston firefighters who lost their lives in a Back Bay fire earlier this year.

NEADS, a nonprofit organization based in Princeton, Mass., will hold a special event Thursday at the Engine 33, Ladder 15 Firehouse in Boston to honor Lt. Edward Walsh and firefighter Michael Kennedy, who died in March.

Walsh's widow, Kristen Walsh, and Kennedy's mother, Kathy Crosby-Bell, will have the opportunity to meet the two dogs that they have each been named in honor of the fallen men.

NPR: Service Dog Guides Marathon Bombing Victims Through A Grim Year

Sacha Pfeiffer, NPR -- All Things Considered: At Monday's Boston Marathon, many runners will be on the course to honor the 16 people who lost limbs in last year's bombing. One married couple was among them: Jessica Kensky and Patrick Downes. Among many dark stories of that day, theirs is among the darkest. They were newlyweds of just seven months when each had their left leg blown off. Their injuries were so severe that they were some of the last victims to leave the hospital. But we want to tell you an encouraging part of their story. It involves an 80-pound black Labrador retriever named Rescue who is specially trained as a Service Dog by NEADS. Full Story

MSNBC: How Boston marathon bombing survivors celebrated Valentine’s Day

Claire Kim, MSNBC: Two survivors of the Boston Marathon bombings celebrated Valentine’s Day in a very special way at Copley Place, near the site of the attack last April. Jessica Kensky enlisted the help of an organization called NEADS to plan a surprise for her husband Patrick Downes. The couple stood near the finish line when the bombs went off during the marathon and were seriously injured.

The Boston Globe: Nonprofit reaches out to bombing victims with an offer of service dogs

Sharron Kahn Luttrell, The Boston Globe: Since the Boston Marathon bombings, Jessica Kensky and her husband, Patrick Downes, have been grappling with the enormity of all they have lost. The attack cost each a leg, casting the young couple into a nightmarish world of trauma and recovery and shattering their plan to move to the West Coast, where Downes had accepted a pre-doctoral internship in clinical psychology. But late last month, the flow of loss was offset a bit when the couple gained something: a young, black Labrador retriever named Rescue.

The Boston Globe: Service dogs barred, doubted, and deeply treasured

Beth Teitell, The Boston Globe: When Kevin Lambert’s service dog, a black Lab named Ronnie, senses he’s in a funk, she plunks her head down in his lap or sometimes climbs right onto it, all 65 pounds of her. When they’re out together, she sticks by the Army vet’s side, helping to keep his post traumatic stress disorder at bay, and makes him feel less alone.

Milford Daily News: Mendon mom shares details of her Weekends

Julia Spitz, Milford Daily News: A suburban mom and a prisoner team up to turn a yellow Lab puppy into a faithful service dog. If you think that sounds like a great idea for a movie, you're not alone. CBS Films optioned the rights before "Weekends with Daisy'' was even written. The film might not be coming to a theater near you until 2015 or 2016, but the book by Mendon author Sharron Kahn Luttrell is being released next month. And if you think the movie plot synopsis tells you all you need to know about the book, think again.